This week is Small Business Week.  Small business is the backbone of America and vitally important if we are to pull out of the current sluggish economic recovery in turn providing family supporting jobs to the citizens of Washington state.  Small business generates almost half of every new job and employ half of working Washingtonians.

The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) just released the voting records of all legislators this last session and presenting an important award (Guardian of Small Business) to those truly dedicated to helping small business in our state.  46 legislators received perfect scores.  Patrick Conner, NFIB’s Washington state director said,  “Talk is the cheapest and easiest commodity in politics, and you don’t have to be well-funded to be full of it.  What counts – and what we count – are the votes when it matters”.

Lynda Wilson of DeWils Custom Cabinets and others prepare for a day of legislative testimony. courtesy NFIB.com
Lynda Wilson of DeWils Custom Cabinets and others prepare for a day of legislative testimony. Courtesy NFIB.com.

May 18, 2014 a snapshot of all declared candidates running for office in Clark County appeared in our local newspaper.  It is important to point out that my opponent talks of supporting small business when, in fact, her voting record says otherwise.  She received a failing grade from NFIB .  As is stated in the NFIB press release, “Without exception every elected official claims to be a friend of Main Street, but today’s release of the Guardian of Small Business Award winners is the only accurate barometer measuring true friends.”  

I am proud to say that I am on the Leadership Council of the NFIB.  As a small business owner myself, I understand what it takes to encourage and promote what businesses need to grow and to create those much needed jobs in Washington state.

“That only 69 out of 147 state legislators could bother to be of help to the state’s small-business owners, who generate almost every new job and employ half of working Washingtonians, is perhaps the most damning commentary that our state still remains not very entrepreneurially friendly.”

“Talk is the cheapest and easiest commodity in politics, and you don’t have to be well-funded to be full of it,” said Patrick Connor, NFIB’s Washington state director, “what counts – and what we count – are the votes when it matters.

Another 23 state lawmakers had between 80 percent and 90 percent voting records, reported Connor, who added, “That only 69 out of 147 state legislators could bother to be of help to the state’s small-business owners, who generate almost every new job and employ half of working Washingtonians, is perhaps the most damning commentary that our state still remains not very entrepreneurially friendly.”